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EDWARD BEESON, , SR.[1, 2, 3]
 1652 - 1712

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  • Suffix  , SR. 
    Birth  1652  Thrussington, Leicestershire County, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3, 4, 5
    Gender  Male 
    Occupation  Planter or Yeoman  [3, 6
    Religion  24 FEB 1659/60, Quaker  [3, 6
    Residence  New Castle County, Delaware, Stoke, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 6
    Died  20 Oct 1712  Nottingham, Chester County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 6, 7
    Buried  Unknown Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Person ID  I1698  Welcomer and Poor Relatives
    Last Modified  10 Aug 2009 00:00:00 
     
    Father  THOMAS BEESON, b. 1634, Stoke, Lancashire, England  
    Mother  Anne Pecke, b. Jun 1632, England  
    Family ID  F597  Group Sheet
     
    Family  Rachel Pennington, b. 11 Nov 1662, Thrussington, Leicestershire County, England  
    Married  7 Nov 1682  Thrussington, Leicestershire County, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 8, 9
    Notes 
    • [odj ancestors.FTW]

      Notes:

      Marriage also shown as November 7, 1682, St. Margaret Church,London, England.
    Children 
    >1. Edward Beeson, , Jr., b. 1685, Lancaster, Lancashire, England
    Family ID  F596  Group Sheet
     
  • Notes 
    • [odj ancestors.FTW]

      Notes:


      Birth: Shown as Stoke, Lancashire, England

      Death: Shown as 1725, History of the Beeson Family, Chester County,
      Pennsylvania.

      Shown as March 1713/14 Nottingham, Chester County, Pennsylvania.

      Will: His will was the first to be recorded in Chester County, Priorto his
      all wills were recorded in Philadelphia.

      Information given to William Earl Beason and wife Juanita, at thePublic Library, Columbus, Texas, in 1995.

      Sources of information:

      Their Ancestors & Ours, William Hunt & Sarah Mills - ElaineHowland,Dallas,Texas, 1981.
      LDS SlC UTAH: Bishop Transcripts 594970, 592579.
      Correspondence in 1911 with W. H. Bailey of Derby ENGLAND,descendantof Valentine Beeson of Thrussington. (Dorothy Baldricke, EdwardBeeson's wife that died in ENGLAND.
      Quaker Records Cope/Dorman.

      BEZON (French) Immigrant to Chester Co., PA - Came to America, in1688, from Stokes ENGLAND, to New Castle Co., DE, to West Nottingham,1701, to Bucks Co., PA, To Chester Co.
      Pennsylvania.

      Beeson Genealogy, by Jasper Luther Beeson:

      From William Penn to Mary Pennington, and from her to Edward Beeson,March 10, 1703---one thousand two hundred and fifty acres of land tobe located in Pennsylvania. Later, Edward Beeson obtained warants forseven hundred ninety two acres of land in Bradford Township, now WestBradford. This land was assigned to Richard Buffington and others, afterit was surveyed in 1711. The Beesons were, at that time, related tothe Penns and Penningtons, as well as to the Buffingtons.

      From 1650 to 1680 there lived in Stoke, England, and afterwards atNottingham, a Beeson who had sons as follows. Edward, Richard,Isaac, and William. William returned to England. His children were:(See William (4).

      Signature followed name Edward Beeson (0).
      (This signature was traced from an assignment dated May 18, 1711,the original is on file in the archives of the Historical Societyof Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia. A photostatic copy of it may beobtained from the society.

      Copy furnished by C. E. Beeson, of Pittsburgh, Pa.)

      "Edward Beeson (1) came to America around the year
      1682, he being at that time, so far as can be
      determined at present, in the neighborhood of thirty
      years of age. Early deeds and records advise that he
      was a "planter" or "yeoman," and these same papers,
      which are the first information of him, give his
      residence as "Irishtown," New Castle County, Delaware.
      This village was situated on the ground now being a
      part of the ninth ward of the city of Wilmington."--C.
      E. Beeson.

      Byron A. Beeson, in his publication, "The Beeson
      Family," states, "Edward Beeson and his wife, Rachel
      Pennington, came to America, from Lancaster, England,
      during 1682 or 1684, among the Penn emigrants, settling
      in West Nottingham, Chester County, Pennsylvania."

      Edward Beeson of Fon-du-Lac, Wisconsin, in his
      History of the Beeson Family in America, 1890, says,
      "In 1682 there came to America with the emigrants of
      William Penn, from Stoke Lancashire, England, Edward
      Beeson and wife, Rachel Pennington, with their four
      sons and several daughters. They settled in New
      Castle, below Philadelphia and remained there for a few
      years."

      According to good authorities his brother, Richard,
      accompanied him, and later returned to England.

      It is likely that Edward Beeson was not a Quaker,
      as his name has not been found in the records of that
      church, though he lived among Quakers, and all of his
      children were of that faith.

      "Among the earliest records found of Edward Beeson
      (1) in America is in the Pennsylvania archives 2nd
      Series, Volume XIX, page 245, in the Minutes of the
      Meetings of William Penn's Commissioners of Property
      Sitting at Philadelphia, 14th, 11 month, 1701"--C. E.
      Beeson. This is a petition of "Cornelius Epson for
      himself and several others to the number of twenty
      families to make settlement on a tract of land about
      half-way between the Delaware and Susquehannah," etc.

      On 7th, 1 month, 1701-2 land warants were issued to
      these petitioners, among whom was Edward Beeson, who
      obtained 980 acres of land located in the southwestern
      corner of Chester County, Nottingham township,
      Pennsylvania, near the Maryland Line. The land survey
      was made 3d month, 1702.

      "Here he made himself a new home and lived until
      his death, which occurred March 1714." C. E. Beeson.

      Edward Beeson's name appears in the following deeds
      and conveyances: April 28, 1702, a deed from Hance
      Peterson to Edward Beeson, 266 acres in Brandywine
      Hundred on the Delaware River, near Treedy Hook is
      recorded in Deed Book B, Vol. 2, p. 171, New Castle
      County, Delaware.

      By a deed also in the same county, Edward Beeson
      (1) conveyed this same land to his son, Edward (2) on
      Jan. 7,1709-10.

      Deed Book F, 5, page 546 Philadelphia, shows the
      following: "Daniel Wharley, of Giles Chalfont, County
      of Buck's England, and Mary, formerly Mary Pennington
      (Half-sister to William Penn's first wife) conveys 1250
      acres to Edward Beeson, of Irishtown, in the county of
      New Castle, Planter, mar. 10 and 11, 1703."

      "9br., 16th, 1706 granted to Edward Beeson liberty
      to settle on a tract near Nottingham, in which Tho.
      Taylor was settled, and the refusal of it is Promised
      him. Given him for this under Ed. S., T. S. and J.
      L.'s hands." (Initials of the three Commissioners.)

      On Sept. 28, 1709, a warrant was granted to Edward
      Beeson for 799 1/2 acres of land.

      In the Masuscript Department of the Historical
      Society of Pennsylvania is a warrant, this paper is
      dated "Phila. X br. 14, 1709." It is the original
      order of Jacob Taylor to Isaac Taylor, Surveyor of
      Chester County, to survey and lay out to Edward Beeson
      the 799 1/2 acres as above mentioned, the back of which
      is endorsed in the handwriting of Edward Beeson as
      given below.

      This eightenth day of May, 1711, I Edward Beson of
      Nottingham do asine over to Richad Buefingtong,
      Benjamin Hickman, Thomas Buefintong and Richard
      Buefontong Juner all of westown In the county of
      Chester, this with in warrant.

      Ass witness my hand


      Edward Beeson."

      Note that the name is spelled both Beson and
      Beeson.


      Records concerning the early Beesons are to be found mainly in thePennsylvania Archives and in the archives of the Society ofFriends or Quakers. The method of dasting the documents and familyrecords was in accordance with "The great law or body of laws of theProvince of Pennsylvania and territories there unto belonging, pastat an assembly held in Chester (Alias Upland) the 7th day of ye 10thmonth, called December 1682, "as shown in the following section:
      "35. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid that thedays of the week and the months of the year shall be called as inScripture and not by heathen names (as is Vulgarly used) as the firstsecond and third days of ye week, and the first second and third monthsof ye year, and the beginning with ye day called Sunday and theMonth called March." Prior to the year 1752 the year began withMarch 25, which was 1st month, 1st day, then, 1st month 8th day wasApril 1, 10th month was December, and 11 month the January following.This form of dating has caused confusion and errors intranslation both the number of the month into names, and in thenumber of the day of the month.

      On the 7th day of the 1st month 1701/02 land warrants were
      issued to these petitioners among whom was Edward Beeson, who
      obtained 980 acres of land located in the southwestern corner of
      Chester County in Nottingham Township near the Maryland line.
      The land survey was made during the 3rd month 1702.

      Hance Patterson deeded 266 acres of land in Brandywine
      Hundred on the Delaware River near Tready Hook to Edward Beeson
      on Apr. 28, 1702.

      The original order of Jacob Taylor to Isaac Taylor, Surveyor
      of Chester County to survey and lay out 799-1/2 acres of land
      granted to Edward Beeson is dated at Philadelphia 1Oth month 14th
      day 1709. The endorsement in the handwriting of Edward Beeson on
      the back of this warrant is as follows:

      "This eighteenth day of May 1711 I Edward Beson of
      Nottingham do asine over unto Richard Buefingtong Benjamin
      Hickman Thomas Buefintong and Richard Buefontong Juner all of
      westown In the county of Chester, this with in warrant.

      Edward Beeson"

      The 266 acres in Brandywine Hundred on the Delaware River
      was deeded from Edward Beeson to his son, Edward, on January 7,
      1710.

      It may be of interest to know that the will of
      Edward Beeson was the first will to be recorded in
      Chester County, Pa. Prior to that time all wills
      recorded from that section of the country had to be
      taken to Philadelphia. The will is as follows:

      "I Edward Beeson of Notingham, being laid on a bed
      of sickness & not knowinghow the Lord may dispose of me
      as to my naturall Life therefore I do make this my last
      will & testament and does declare all other will or
      wills made or done by me to be void and of none effect,
      first my will is that I be decentely buried & my
      funeral expenses and all debts be duly payd, 2ly, I
      give to my son Edward & his heirs 142 acres & half on
      Land Laying by nessamoney, 3rdly, I give unto my son
      Richard and his heirs one tract of Land Laying near
      Southampton in the County of Bucks, containing 290
      acres, 4ly I give to my son Richard and his heirs one
      tract of Liberty Land containing 25 acres Laying on
      Sculkill. 5ly I do give to my son William my west Loot
      Laying in Notingham also I give unto him 48 pounds
      which my Executors is to lay out for him in building
      him a house & buying him such necessaryes as they may
      see most needfull for him for making a plantation, also
      I give unto him all my wearing apparell except two
      great coats, which two coats I give to Edward &
      Richard, Edward is to have which he pleased, also I
      give to my son William one coat of the Carsey that is
      at the weavers, also my will is that if my son William
      should dy without ishew Lawfully begotten, then the
      Land is to go to the Lawful heirs. 6ly, I give to my
      Daughter Ann Cloud Twenty pounds, 7ly, my will is that
      after my former wifes children have had their portions,
      that all my personall estate be divided betwixt my
      widow and my Daughter Elizabeth according to a Law.8ly,
      my will is that my widow shall have the plantation
      whereon I live, with all the profits thereof during her
      widdowhood or give it to my Daughter Elizabeth & her
      heirs. 9ly, my will is that my executors & their heirs
      shall have all that Land which I have purchased of
      Daniel Wharley & by warrant to me by the Commisioners
      bearing the date of 14th day of Septr., 1709, to
      dispose of as they see occasion, and I desire ye my
      wife shall give to the child ye she is now great with,
      if it should live when born, fourty pounds and Lastly
      for a full and finall performance of this will I Do by
      these presents make & ordain my dear and well beloved
      wife and son Richard the sole executors of this my last
      will and Testament as witness my hand & Seal this
      Twentieth of the sixth month, called August 1712.

      Signed Sealed & Delivered before us

      EDWARD BEESON (Seal)

      H. Andrew Job
      James King
      Chester County S S,"

      Henry Hart Beeson, book:

      BEGINNINGS IN AMERICA

      Most of the Beesons now living in the United States are
      descendants of one Edward Beeson 1. It is said that he came to
      America in 1682 or 1684 on one of the William Penn voyages from
      Stoke, Lancaster, England, and settled in New Castle, below
      Philadelphia.

      The family is of English origin and the name a corruption of
      Beeston, which is an old family of or near Leeds, England.
      Lineages can be traced back to the fifteenth century in the
      personage of Thomas Beeston of Beeston, a small village near
      Leeds, down through his great-great-grandson, Sir George Beeston,
      who was living in 1595. The Coat of Arms born by both the Beeston
      and Beeson families is the same and is of the ancient family
      seated at Cheshire at a very early period - blazoned, "Argent, a
      bend between six bees sable. Crest, on a mount Vert a Castle, or
      issuing there from an arm embowed brandishing a sword."

      Tradition states that the Beesons were of French origin, and
      that there was an officer in the army of William the Conqueror
      named Bezon. After the Norman conquest, he became an officer in
      the Royal Guard. His descendants settled in the Isle of Man,
      where one of them married a daughter of the ruler of the island.
      After the Norman conquest, he became an officer in the Royal
      Guard. His descendants settled in the Isle of Man, where one of
      them married a daughter of the ruler of the island. He afterwards
      returned to Lancashire, where his descendants became numerousand can still be found.

      Edward Beeson was not the first of that surname to come to
      America. Capt. Thomas Beeson settled in Maryland prior to 1657
      and was a Burgess from Anne Arundel County to the House of
      Assebly held at St. Marys. His will was recorded in 1679 in Anne
      Arundel Co. and shows sons John, William, and Thomas and a
      daughter Martha, wife Hester. He also had a daughter, Ann, who
      married Nicholas Gassaway. Nothing further is known of this
      family. There was also a Thomas Beeson who owned land in York
      Co., Maine in 1676 and nothing further is known of him.

      The earliest known documentary evidence of Edward Beeson in
      America is a record dated the 14th day of the 11th. month 1701
      when he and several others petitioned William Penn's
      Commissioners of Property sitting at Philadelphia to make
      settlement on a tract of land about half way between the Delaware
      River and the Susquehanna River.

      On the 7th day of the 1st month 1701/02 land warrants were
      issued to these petitioners among whom was Edward Beeson, who
      obtained 980 acres of land located in the southwestern corner of
      Chester County in Nottingham Township near the Maryland line.
      The land survey was made during the 3rd month 1702.

      Hance Patterson deeded 266 acres of land in Brandywine
      Hundred on the Delaware River near Tready Hook to Edward Beeson
      on Apr. 28, 1702.

      The original order of Jacob Taylor to Isaac Taylor, Surveyor
      of Chester County to survey and lay out 799-1/2 acres of land
      granted to Edward Beeson is dated at Philadelphia 1Oth month 14th
      day 1709. The endorsement in the handwriting of Edward Beeson on
      the back of this warrant is as follows:

      "This eighteenth day of May 1711 I Edward Beson of
      Nottingham do asine over unto Richard Buefingtong Benjamin
      Hickman Thomas Buefintong and Richard Buefontong Juner all of
      westown In the county of Chester, this with in warrant.

      Edward Beeson"

      The 266 acres in Brandywine Hundred on the Delaware River
      was deeded from Edward Beeson to his son, Edward, on January 7,
      1710.

      It is generally believed that Edward Beeson's first wife's
      name was Rachel Pennington, whom he had married in England. It is
      not known what relation she was to Mary Pennington Wharley, who
      was a half sister to Guilema Maria Springett, the first wife of
      William Penn. It has been said that they were half-sisters.
      However, the will of Mary Pennington (mother of Mary Wharley)
      proven In England Oct. 11, 1682 mentions only the following
      children: sons William, Edward, and John and daughter, Mary, and
      daughter, Guilema Maria Penn. Mary Proud, daughter of Sir John
      Proude of Goodnestone Court, Kent, Married Sir William Springett
      and had one daughter, Guilema Maria, who married William Penn.
      The other children mentioned in the will are those by her second
      husband, Isaac Pennington, son of Sir Isaac Pennington, Lord
      Mayor of London.

      Edward Beeson married a second time in America to Elizabeth.
      One record gives her as a widow Holmes when she married Edward
      Beeson. She has also been referred to as the daughter of Henry
      Grubb. After Edward's death, she married Joseph Rich.

      The will of Edward Beeson Is the first will to be recorded
      In Chester County. Prior to that time, all wills from that part
      of the country were recorded in Philadelphia. The will is as
      follows:

      "I Edward Beeson of Nottingham, being laid on a bed of
      sickness & not knowing how the Lord may dispose of me as to my
      natural Life therefore I do make this my last will & testament
      and does declare all other will or wills made or done by me to be
      void and of none effect, first my will Is that I be decently
      buried & my funeral expenses and all debts be duly payd, 2ly. I
      Give to my son Edward & his heirs 142 acres & a nald of Land
      Laying by nessamoney, 3rd, I give unto my son Richard and his
      heirs one tract of Land Laying near Southampton in the County of
      Bucks, containing 290 acres, 4ly I give to my son Richard and his
      heirs one tract of Liberty Land containing 25 acres Lying on
      Sculkill. 5ly I do give to my son William my west Loot Laying in
      Nottingham also I give unto him 48 pounds which my Executors is
      to lay out for him in building him a house & buying him such
      necessaryes as they may see most needful for him for making a
      plantation, also I give unto him all my wearing apparell except
      two great coats, which two coats I give to Edward & Richard,
      Edward is to have which he pleased, also I give to my son William
      one coat of Carsey that is at the weavers, also my will is that
      if my son William should dy without ishew Lawfully begotten, then
      the Land is to go to the Lawful heirs. 6ly, I give to my
      daughter Ann Cloud Twenty pounds, 7ly, my will is that after my
      former wifes children have had their portions that all my
      personnall estate be divided betwixt my widow and my Daughter
      Elizabeth according to Law. 8ly, my will is that my widow shall
      have the plantation whereon I live with all the profits thereof
      during her widowhood or natural Life & after my widows marrying
      or decease, then I give it to my Daughter Elizabeth & her heirs.
      9ly, my will is that my executors & their heirs shall have all
      that Land which I have purchased of Daniel Wharley & by Warrant
      to me by the Commissioners bearing the date of 14th day of Septr,
      1709, to dispose of as they see occasion, and I desire yt my wife
      shall give to the child yt she is now great with, if it should
      live when born, forty pounds and Lastly for a full and finall
      performance of this will I do by these presents make & ordain my
      dear and well beloved wife and son Richard the sole executors of
      this my last will and Testament as witness muland & Seal this
      Twentieth of the sixth month, called August 1712.

      Signed Sealed & Delivered before us
      Andrew Job
      James King
      Edward Beeson (Seal)
      Chester County SS;"

      Note. The method of dating the documents and family records
      was in accordance with "The great law or body of laws of the
      Provence of Pennsylvania and territories thereto belonging, past
      at an assembly held in Chester (Upland) the 7th day of ye 1Oth
      month called December 1682" as shown by the following section:
      "35. And Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid that
      the dayes of the Week and ye months of the year shall be called
      as in Scripture and not be Heathen names (as is vulgarly used) as
      the first second and third days of ye week, and the first second
      and third months of ye year, and beginning with ye Day called
      Sunday and the Month called March."

      Prior to the year 1752, the quaker year began with March 25,
      which was 1st momth, 1st day. This form of dating has caused much
      confusion and errors in translating both the number of the month
      into names and in the number of the day of the month. In 1752,
      January 1 became the 1st month, 1st day. Throughout the text,
      dates given such as 4 mo. 4 da. would refer to the fourth day of
      the fourth month in accordance with the foregoing. Where a date
      is given as 2-1-1700, this refers to February 1, 1700.

      Letter from Mrs. Margaret Hammond Beeson, Chattanooga, TN, Sept. 7, 1993.

      She states that the children of Edward Beeson are recorded inHinshaw's Genealogy and Genealogy Assoc., Salt Lake City, Utah.

      Letter from Leslie W. Beason, Feb. 1, 1995, 721 Jappa Rd., Ely, IA 52227.

      Edward Beeson, was born in about 1660 in or near Lancaster,England. He married Rachel Pennington in this locality in about 1680.They migrated from Lancaster, England to America in 1682 at whichtime Pennsylvania was being settled by William Penn and his followers,the persecuted Quakers.

      Pennsylvania, comprising 48,000 square miles, had been granted toPenn by King Charles in payment for $80,000 owed by the Crown tothe Penn estate; and the Duke of York had given Penn a Quitclaim deedto Delaware. The two provinces were governed by one governor orgovernment even though Delaware was not originally settled by Quakers.Several thousands of settlers were already there--Swedes, Dutch,English, Germans, Hugenots. Four ships loaded mostly withQuakers came to Pennsylvania in 1681.

      Edward and Rachel were favorable to the teachings fof Penn; and itis believed that they came to America with William Penn on the Ship"Welcome". Penn had about 100 Quakers with him when he left EnglandSeptember 1, 1682. He landed at New Castle, Delaware with abouttwo-thirds that number October 27, 1682. About one-third had died fromsmallpox on the trip.

      Edward and Rachel left the ship at this landing and settled in thevillage of Irishtown, New Castle County, Delaware. They moved fromthere to Berkley County, Virginia where there was a settlementof Quakers. Finally they moved to Chester County, Pennsylvania. Recordsshow that a land grant of 980 acres in Chester County,Pennsylvania was made to Edward Beeson in 1701. His will, dividing thisproperty among his heirs, dated in 1713, states that he wasthen living at Nottingham, Chester County, Pennsylvania.

      Edward and Rachel were parents of three sons and one daughter. AfterRachel's death Edward married Elizabeth by whom he was the fatherof two daughters.
     
  • Sources 
    1. [S309] Henry Hart Beeson, book, Henry Hart Beeson, (1968)

    2. [S140] Beeson-Beason Genealogy, 1987, Mickey Elliott

    3. [S134] odj ancestors.FTW, Date of Import: Dec 4, 2008

    4. [S141] Beeson Genealogy, Jasper Luther Beeson, (Appoximately 1927), Beeson Genealogy, by Jasper Luther Beeson.

    5. [S369] History of the Beeson Family, Chester County, Pennsylvania

    6. [S141] Beeson Genealogy, Jasper Luther Beeson, (Appoximately 1927)

    7. [S369] History of the Beeson Family, Chester County, Pennsylvania, Death shown as 1725.

    8. [S369] History of the Beeson Family, Chester County, Pennsylvania, Marriage shown as 1680, Lancaster, Stoke, England.

    9. [S531]

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